Let's talk for a minute about growing squash. . .

Squash need fertile soil with lots of organic matter and good drainage. Squash, both summer and winter types, are heat loving vegetables and do best in warm soil. To increase the warmth of your soil, put black plastic or an old tire around the plant. Squash will also do better if they have plenty of room to grow. Except for bush types, squash plants require six to eight feet in all directions. Water squash deeply and regularly. Sometimes squash plants will wilt during the extreme heat of the day, but will recover in the cool of the evening. If this happens, and you have been watering deeply and regularly, it's nothing to worry about and won't effect the flavor of the fruit. When the plants begin to run and produce blossoms, it's a good time to side dress the plant with a high phosphate fertilizer such as 16-16-16. Sprinkle it around the edge of the watering basin and water it in. When a fertilizer is used that is higher in nitrogen than phosphate, you may have beautiful vines but the fruit has difficulty setting and forming. Manure is not a good fertilizer choice for most squash because of the high nitrogen content. Always use a fertilizer that has a formula with a second number equal to or higher than the first number to prevent this problem. Each squash plant will produce both male and female flowers, and the first flowers to appear are male and will not set fruit. Many gardeners worry when they observe that no fruit is setting at first, but a little later, the female flowers will appear and fruit begins to grow. If you have insect in the squash, and you want to avoid a chemical insecticide, try Natural Guard Diatomaceous Earth, which contains silica dioxide. This compound is non-toxic to people and animals, but it is very effective on insects, and insects cannot build up an immunity to it. Or, you can try mixing one tablespoon of Dawn dish washing liquid, one tablespoon of cayenne pepper, and one tablespoon of garlic powder in a gallon of water, stir until the mix becomes frothy and the garlic odor is strong, and then pour it over and around the plant. If you prefer to resort to a chemical insecticide, be sure to follow directions carefully.