‘State of the County’ Addresses Delivered by Uintah County Commissioners

Monday’s Uintah County Commission meeting included ‘State of the County’ addresses from each Commissioner. Among several topics, new County Commissioner Bart Haslem said he is looking forward to the decisions being made to better the county and better the job market. Specifically, Haslem said the railroad project is more viable than ever before thanks to progress made in the last two weeks. Haslem explained that he was originally opposed to the railroad because he didn’t think there was any way to pay for it but now has learned of the partnerships and funding opportunities that can make it possible. He also mentioned work on a potential gas pipeline. Haslem says it is an exciting time in Uintah County and he feels he’s in the right place at the right time to help. Commissioner Brad Horrocks shared several highlights and areas where progress is being made. He explained that the Governor’s Office is considering having the main office for the Community Impact Board moved to Uintah County. 70 percent of all mineral lease money comes from Uintah County, explained Horrocks, and it would be a good thing to have them in Uintah County. Horrocks also commented on the homeless bill in last year’s legislature and that work is being done for the local homeless shelter to also receive funds. He thanked previous Sheriff Vance Norton for his work in having state inmates contracted at the Uintah County Jail and also highlighted events including the upcoming John Wesley Powell celeration, the U-RAT conference, and mountain bike tournaments. Commissioner Bill Stringer focused more on the economy and finances than the other two. “I do think there is room to be optimistic, provided we are cautious,” said Stringer, who then spoke about the City/County meeting from two weeks ago that has resulted in some negativity. The purpose of that meeting, explained Stringer, was to be proactive. Mineral lease money funds the 6 Special Service Districts and the money has been getting tighter and tighter, stated Stringer, who emphasized that the meeting was not held to say “Let’s close the Districts” but instead to prepare all to live in a new environment where the money is not what it once was.  Commissioner Stringer finished his address stating that he feels the county has the right leadership to do the job that needs done moving forward.

 

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Commissioner Haslem  

Commissioner Haslem  

Commissioner Horrocks  

Commissioner Horrocks  

Commissioner Stringer  

Commissioner Stringer  

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Kristin Baldwin

Kristin never planned to work in news radio but has thoroughly enjoyed being part of the news team at KVEL. Her love of literature and writing developed in high school which led her to study English Literature and Technical Writing at BYU. She received her BA in English from BYU in 2005 and studied at UVU in Orem for 2 semesters to become a Certified Technical Writer in 2006. Two months after completion she began her dream job of being a stay-at-home mom.  As mother of 2 energetic kids, she began writing from home for the KVEL news team in 2011 and considers it the perfect fit as a full time mom and part time writer.